Category

Seminar

Social Media for Social Good – Talk 3
How to Make the Internet Safer and Better?

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Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/jPgy9k

 

Speaker:
Ms. Mia Garlick (Director of Policy at Facebook)

Panelists:
Hon. Charles Mok (Member of Legislative Council of Hong Kong, Information Technology)
Ms. Siu Man Hsu (Supervisor, Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups)

Moderator:
Prof. Paul Yip (Director of HKJC Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, HKU)

Date : Feb 22, 2017 (Wednesday)
Time : 9:30 – 10:30
Venue : Studio 3, 2/F, The Hong Kong Jockey Club Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. Read More

Neighbourhood effects on wellbeing:
Two multilevel analyses of life satisfaction and substance use from Hong Kong and Taiwan

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Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/7JdhWJ 

Speaker: Dr. Shu-Sen Chang (College of Public Health, National Taiwan University)
Date : Sept 23, 2016 (Friday)
Time : 12:00 – 13:00
Venue : Studio 2, 2/F, The Hong Kong Jockey Club Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.

Abstract

There is a growing body of literature on the effect of neighbourhood socioeconomic characteristics on individuals’ health and wellbeing. The substantial growth of understanding in this area benefits much from the advent and access to multilevel analysis, which enables the disentangling of effects of individual- and neighbourhood-level factors. In this seminar multilevel analyses based on two population-based, representative samples from Hong Kong and Taiwan will be presented. The Hong Kong study investigated the association of neighbourhood socioeconomic factors with individuals’ life satisfaction and happiness. The Taiwanese study examined the association of neighbourhood socioeconomic factors with individuals’ use of alcohol, tobacco, betel nut, and illicit drugs. Limitations and implications of the findings will be discussed.

About the speaker

Dr Shu-Sen Chang MD, MSc, PhD, is currently Assistant Professor at the College of Public Health, National Taiwan University. He was trained and had practiced as a psychiatrist in Taiwan (2001-2007), and completed his PhD in Bristol, UK (2010). His research interests include suicide and suicide prevention, community mental health, psychiatric epidemiology, and spatial epidemiology.

Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/7JdhWJ 
Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

Developing Comprehensive, Integrated Approaches to Suicide Prevention

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Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/MkcAmk

Speaker: Dr. Eric D. Caine (University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester)
Date : Sept 23, 2016 (Friday)
Time : 11:00 – 12:00
Venue : Studio 2, 2/F, The Hong Kong Jockey Club Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.

Abstract

To date, there have been no effective, broadly applied, comprehensive and sustainable approaches to preventing suicide and risk-related premature deaths in the United States.  Rare examples of exceptional programs exist – in the US Air Force and the police force of Montreal, Quebec, Canada – but no one has replicated these results, nor is it clear that they are suitable for dealing with the extraordinary diversity within and between states, let alone an entire country. Preventing suicides and premature deaths – to the extent that there is a substantial reduction in population-level rates – will require systemic, systematically applied and coordinated interventions. They will require carefully crafted public health initiatives that reach far ‘upstream’ while also dealing with persons on the ‘edge of death.’ While suicide is often viewed from the perspectives of individuals who have killed themselves, these deaths are drawn from diverse groups who share common characteristics. Effective prevention programs must address the diversity of these groups even as it is essential to meet the needs of individuals suffering great distress. Suicide prevention must be built as a mosaic; no single piece will convey the entire picture.

This presentation will consider what elements are necessary for creating and sustaining the mosaic of efforts required for preventing suicide, attempted suicide, and antecedent risks that are common to these adverse outcomes, as well as other related forms of premature death.  It will consider the challenges involved when promoting effective, broad based coalitions; the opportunities from forging synergies among diverse groups; the development of dynamic models to explore the impact of programmatic changes and interventions; and the central role of culture change that will be essential to creating and sustaining a powerfully effective suicide prevention movement.

About the speaker

Dr. Caine has served since 1996 as John Romano Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center and Co-Director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide (CSPS) since its founding in 1998. He has deep experience in the evaluation, management, and aftercare of acutely suicidal individuals, dating to the 1970s. Dr. Caine recently was a member of the Task Force charged with reformulating the National Strategy of Suicide Prevention, a subgroup of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and now co-chairs its ‘Impact Group’, which will track the effects of the new strategy on national rates of suicide.

Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/MkcAmk
Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

Modeling Natural Language Semantics in the Internet Era

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Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/ANa4lH

Speaker: Dr. Tin Kam HO (IBM Watson)
Date : Aug 24, 2016 (Wednesday)
Time : 11:00 – 12:30
Venue : Studio 2, 2/F, HKJC BIR, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam.

Abstract

Computational models of learning for audio-visual signal understanding have attracted new attention. In a broader pursuit of artificial intelligence, similar methods are being pushed to another exciting frontier — modeling the semantics of natural languages, concepts, and thought. I will describe our recent attempts on using algorithms to derive and exploit representations of natural language semantics and concept structures. Such representations provide building blocks for larger learning tasks involving sentiments, discoveries, and reasoning.

Research in this area has benefited from many new resources and computational platforms available only through the Internet. I will discuss how it makes use of big data, crowd sourcing, and web services in a unique way. Fierce competitions in the industry are driving the development of applications quickly around any solid progress. There are rich potentials for broader impact from the resources born out of such competitions.

About the speaker

Dr. TIN KAM HO is a Research Staff Member at IBM Watson, where she works in natural language semantics modeling. Formerly she was with Bell Labs, as a Research Scientist and later as the Head of Statistics and Learning Research Department. She pioneered research in multiple classifier systems, random decision forests, and data complexity analysis, and developed many solutions to problems in reading systems, wireless geo-location, smart grid demand forecasting, and optical networks. Her contributions were recognized by several Bell Labs awards, a Young Scientist Award in 1999, and the Pierre Devijver Award for Statistical Pattern Recognition in 2008. She is an elected Fellow of the International Association for Pattern Recognition and the IEEE. She served as Editor and Associate Editor for several journals, and as Editor-in-chief of Pattern Recognition Letters in 2004-2010. She received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from SUNY at Buffalo in 1992.

 

Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/ANa4lH

Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

Updates on Mental Health Intervention in Mainland China

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Please register via https://goo.gl/fOnKSL

 

Date : June 14, 2016 (Tuesday)
Time : 10:30 – 12:00
Venue : Studio 2, 2/F, HKJC Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.

Topic 1 – Depression Care Management with ICT in China

Speaker : Prof. Shulin CHEN, MD, PhD. Professor at Department of Psychology, Zhejiang University

Abstract

Epidemiological studies indicate that late-life depression is a major public health problem in China and around the world. Under-recognition and under-treatment of mental disorders in older adults, including depression, are extremely common in China. Dr. Chen and his team are utilizing Information and Communication Technologies to improve a depression care management (DCM) in Hangzhou. Dr. Chen will share with the audience how the team developed a mobile mental health solution to empower primary care practitioners to manage depression cases and scale up DCM model around China.

About the speaker

Prof. Shulin CHEN, MD, PhD. Professor at Department of Psychology, Zhejiang University, expertise in geriatric mental health and community-based mental health interventions in China.

Topic 2 – Students Psychological Crisis Intervention in China

Speaker : Dr. Ri-fang CAO, the chief psychiatrist at the Mental Health Center, School of Medicine of Zhejiang University

Abstract

Dr. Cao will report the pilot projects in Hangzhou for student psychological crisis intervention, including: (1) building suicide prevention network for secondary school students, (2) developing routine mental health survey on secondary school students, (3) screening university students’ mental problem, and (4) gatekeeper training programmes.

About the speaker

Dr. Ri-fang CAO is the chief psychiatrist at the Mental Health Center, School of Medicine of Zhejiang University. With his rich clinical experiences in psychiatry and mental health intervention, he is also the secretary-general of Committee of Crisis Intervention, Chinese Association for Mental Health.

Please register via https://goo.gl/fOnKSL

Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

[Cancelled] The Black Sheep Penalty: Impact of Delinquent Friendship Networks and Neighborhood Context on Suicidal Ideation among South Korean Youths

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SEMINAR CANCELLATION NOTICE

Please be advised that this seminar has been cancelled due to Dr. Kim’s family issue. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Please register by https://goo.gl/iEin8l

Speaker: Dr. Harris Hyun-soo Kim (Ewha Womans University) Date : June 3, 2016 (Friday) Time : 15:30 – 16:30 Venue : CPD 2.45, 2/F, The Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus, HKU.

Abstract

In this study we examine the association between ties to delinquent friends and suicidal ideation among adolescents, and whether this association varies according to different neighborhood characteristics. To test these ideas, we analyze two waves of data from the Korean Youth Panel Survey (2006 and 2007), a government-funded multiyear project, which comprise nationally representative samples of South Korean high school students. Results from hierarchical linear models show that, net of other individual and contextual-level covariates (including baseline suicidal ideation from the earlier wave), connections to delinquent peers significantly raise the odds of adolescent suicidality. We also find that this relationship is stronger in neighborhoods with higher average household income and in residential communities that are subjectively perceived to be of better quality (safer). We offer implications of the findings by drawing on the concept of the “black-sheep effect”.

About the speaker

Harris Hyun-soo Kim is Associate Professor of Sociology at Ewha Womans University in Seoul. His main research interests are social networks and social capital, civic engagement and political participation, ethnic enclave economies, and social determinants of health. He has conducted original surveys among ethnic Koreans in urban China, Korean immigrants in Central Asia (Uzbekistan), and foreign-born spouses in Korea. Currently, he is the Principal Investigator of a three-year research project on social networks and adolescent health in Laos, which is funded by the National Research Foundation of Korea. His research has been published in Social Science & Medicine, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, Sociological Perspectives, and Social Science Journal, among others.

Please register by https://goo.gl/iEin8l Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

SEMINAR CANCELLATION NOTICE

Please be advised that this seminar has been cancelled due to Dr. Kim’s family issue. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Social Media for Social Good – Talk 2
Stay Safe and Stay Smart Online — Discussion with Facebook Expert

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Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/wpzB43 or https://goo.gl/vuTYZ9 for public

 

Speaker: Mia Garlick (Director of Policy at Facebook)

Panel Discussion

Moderator: Paul Yip (Director of HKJC Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention)
Panelist: Althea Suen (President of The Hong Kong University Students’ Union)

Date : May 11, 2016 (Wednesday)
Time : 16:00 – 17:30
Venue : CPD 2.58, 2/F, The Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus, HKU.

Abstract

People use social media such as Facebook to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them. Meanwhile, the public are also concerned with online safety issues, such as how to protect your privacy, how to respect others’ rights, and how to help a friend in need. Mia Garlick, Director of Policy, who co-ordinates safety initiatives for Facebook across the Asia-Pacific region, will share her insider’s views on how to stay safe and smart online and how Facebook can work with local NGOs and contribute to local community development. Mia will be joined by Prof. Paul Yip, Director of HKJC Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong, to meet students, scholars and NGO leaders for the first online safety workshop in Hong Kong.

About the speaker

Mia Garlick, Director of Policy at Facebook. Prior to joining Facebook, Mia was the Assistant Secretary for Digital Economy and Convergence Strategy at the Australian Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy. Previously she also worked at YouTube and the non-profit Creative Commons.  She has a Master of Laws from Stanford Law School and Bachelor of Law and Arts from the University of New South Wales.

 

Please register via HKU Event Management System http://goo.gl/wpzB43 or https://goo.gl/vuTYZ9 for public

Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

Social Media for Social Good – Talk 1
Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for Disease and Suicide Prevention

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Please register via http://goo.gl/T1BQPe

 

Speaker: Dr. Vince Silenzio (Associate Professor, Departments of Psychiatry, University of Rochester)
Moderator: Dr. Qijin Cheng (Research Assistant Professor, HKJC Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention)
Date : May 3, 2016 (Tuesday)
Time : 10:30 – 11:30
Venue : Studio 2, 2/F, HKJC Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam.

Abstract

Alan Turing, a founding father of computer science and famous for his contributions to cracking the Nazi ‘ENIGMA’ codes, died by suicide not long after having been convicted for homosexuality and stripped of his security clearance shortly after World War II. Yet with the development of computers, and the ongoing wave of social and technological innovation and disruption it helped to release, new tools for research have been created, including novel approaches to the study and prevention of suicide. We will discuss a brief overview of the technological changes relevant to this area, and the ongoing developments in areas such as data science, machine learning, and network analysis that are creating the very possibility that Mr. Turing’s “Turing Machines” — better known to us as “computers” — may be the key to understanding health and disease in previously unimaginable ways, and, with great historical irony, to ultimately ending suicide within marginalized communities.

About the speaker

Dr. Silenzio is Associate Professor in the departments of Psychiatry, Public Health Sciences, and Family Medicine at the University of Rochester. He leads the Laboratory of Informatics and Network Computational Studies / Network Science Lab. The LINCS/NetSci Lab focuses on the development of advanced network analytic, machine learning, and related data science methods to public health and biomedical research domains. Dr. Silenzio’s specific research focus is on translational data science applications to study and engage dispersed or otherwise hidden populations for data collection and intervention delivery, in order to develop computational models to inform novel, broadly based preventive approaches to in the areas of suicide prevention and HIV/AIDS. He currently directs research training curriculum of the NIH Fogarty International Center-funded eCapacity program in mobile health and computational social epidemiology at the University of Rochester, which targets scholars from across the Asia and Pacific region.

 

Please register via http://goo.gl/T1BQPe

Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

Early Life Risk Factors for Suicide in Young Adults

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poster

Please register via HKU Event Management System (https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_hdetail.aspx?UEID=41497​)

Speaker : Professor Ying-Yeh Chen
Date : Feb 26, 2016 (Friday)
Time : 11:00 – 12:30
Venue : Room 1A, G/F HKJC BIR, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam.

Abstract

This talk includes two studies tapping into early life risk factors for suicide in young adults in Taiwan. The first study investigated the association of perinatal social factors – maternal age, single motherhood, socioeconomic position, birth order and family size with future risk of suicide; and the second study explored the age of exposure to parental suicide and the risk of subsequent suicide completion in young people. Both study made use of linked data from Taiwan Birth Registry and Taiwan Death Registry.   We conclude that early life social circumstances and parental suicide influence future risk of suicide. Factors specific to Taiwanese culture, such as a preference for male offspring and social stigma of suicide, may have influenced gender-specific patterns of risk.

About the speaker

Professor Ying-Yeh Chen is a psychiatrist and a social epidemiologist. She earned her M.D. from Chung-Shan Medical University, Taiwan and got her Doctorate degree from Department of Health and Social Behavior, Harvard University, USA.   She has dedicated to suicide research and suicide prevention work with her clinical duties. Her research focuses on socio-environmental influences on suicide and suicidal behaviors; the social factors she evaluates include the mass-media, gendered socialization, childhood environment and access to suicide means. She also conducts a series of studies on suicide attempters, covering topics on media influences, outcome assessment and rationale for method choice. She is translating her academic finding to policy making. She is Taiwan’s national representative for the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP).

 

Please register via HKU Event Management System (https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_hdetail.aspx?UEID=41497​)

Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232

Overcoming the Barriers to Suicide Prevention

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Seminar 5 Nov 2015

Please register via HKU Event Management System (https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_hdetail.aspx?UEID=40091​)

 

Speaker : Dr. Eric D. Caine
Date : Nov 5, 2015 (Thursday)
Time : 10:00 – 11:00
Venue : Studio 2, 2/F, BIR, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam.

Abstract

To date, there have been no effective, broadly applied, comprehensive and sustainable approaches to preventing suicide and risk-related premature deaths in the United States.  Rare examples of exceptional programs exist – in the US Air Force for about a decade and in the police force of Montreal, Quebec, Canada – but no one has replicated these results, nor is it clear that they are suitable for dealing with the extraordinary diversity within and between states, let alone an entire country.  Preventing suicides and premature deaths – to the extent that there is a substantial reduction in population-level rates – will require systemic, systematically applied and coordinated interventions that, at once, address the needs of both large contributing groups and high-risk individuals; reach across the life course; and are driven by powerful community, health system, and governmental forces.  They will require carefully crafted public health initiatives that reach far ‘upstream’ while also dealing with persons on the ‘edge of death.’  While suicide most often is viewed from the perspectives of individuals who have killed themselves, these deaths are drawn from among diverse groups and populations who share many common characteristics.  Effective prevention programs must, by necessity, address the diversity of these groups even as it is essential meet the needs of individuals suffering great distress.  Suicide prevention must be built as a mosaic; no single piece will convey the entire picture.

The fractured state of suicide prevention efforts reflects the many challenges that must be addressed and barriers overcome in order to build a comprehensive set of approach – what might be called a “full court press” necessary for creating and sustaining the mosaic of efforts required for preventing suicide, attempted suicide, and antecedent risks that are common to these adverse outcomes, as well as other related forms of premature death (e.g., deaths arising from drug overdose).  The presentation will consider promoting effective, broadly based coalitions; the opportunities from forging synergies among diverse groups; and the very central role of “culture change” that will be essential to creating and sustaining a powerfully effective suicide prevention movement.

About the speaker

Dr. Caine has served since 1996 as John Romano Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center and Co-Director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Suicide (CSPS) since its founding in 1998. He has deep experience in the evaluation, management, and aftercare of acutely suicidal individuals, dating to the 1970s. Dr. Caine recently was a member of the Task Force charged with reformulating the National Strategy of Suicide Prevention, a subgroup of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and now co-chairs its ‘Impact Group’, which will track the effects of the new strategy on national rates of suicide.

 

Please register via HKU Event Management System (https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_hdetail.aspx?UEID=40091​)

Enquiries: Please contact Mr. Rickey YAU at csrp@hku.hk or 28315232